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what is a good anti inflammatory diet

There are a great deal of foods that people need to remove from their diets when they start the AIP diet. It’s one of the many reasons I recommended working with a nutritionist who is an AIP-certified coach or a nutritionist well-versed in autoimmune disease and the AIP diet. I get a lot of questions regarding this diet, but one of the main questions I get asked is, why do I have to eliminate this particular food? I thought this or that food was good for me. The elimination of certain foods isn’t saying that there is no nutritional value in said food, just that this particular food could be something that you are reacting to. I will review why certain foods are removed in detail; hopefully, this will answer many of your questions!

List Of The Worst Foods For Autoimmune Disease:

Alcohol 

Alcohol consumption can have a detrimental effect on intestinal permeability, leading to a condition known as “leaky gut.” This condition allows harmful substances, such as bacteria and toxins, to pass through the intestinal lining and enter the bloodstream. This can cause a range of health problems, including:

  • Increased inflammation: Alcohol can disrupt the balance of bacteria in the gut, leading to an overgrowth of harmful bacteria. This can trigger an inflammatory response, damaging the intestinal lining and increasing intestinal permeability.
  • Changes in gut microbiota: Alcohol can also alter the composition of the gut microbiota, which is the community of bacteria that lives in the intestines. A healthy gut microbiota is essential for maintaining a healthy intestinal barrier. When the gut microbiota is disrupted, it can increase intestinal permeability.
  • Impaired tight junction function: Tight junctions are proteins that seal the gaps between intestinal cells. Alcohol can damage tight junctions, making it easier for harmful substances to pass through the intestinal lining.
  • Increased oxidative stress: Alcohol can increase oxidative stress in the body, damaging cells, including intestinal cells. This damage can weaken the intestinal lining and increase intestinal permeability.

The severity of the damage to intestinal permeability caused by alcohol consumption depends on many factors, including the amount of alcohol consumed, the frequency of alcohol consumption, and the overall health of the individual. However, even moderate alcohol consumption can harm intestinal permeability.

Dairy

Dairy is one of the most common foods that people are allergic to. On average, 2-3% of adults and children are considered allergic to dairy. Even trace amounts of dairy protein could be a problem. In addition,  according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), about 65% of the world’s population has lactose intolerance. This means they have difficulty digesting lactose, the sugar in milk and dairy products. Lactose intolerance is caused by a lack of lactase, an enzyme that breaks down lactose into glucose and galactose, which are more accessible for the body to absorb. Dairy also contains protease inhibitors, which have been shown to contribute to intestinal permeability. Dairy also happens to be highly insulinogenic. This could contribute to inflammation and insulin resistance. They also contain hormones that could alter human hormone levels and increase mucous production, which can cause gut irritation. Dairy is also known to be something called a gluten cross-reactor. This means that if you have any issues with gluten, the dairy protein could also stimulate a person’s immune system as if they were eating dairy. 

Symptoms of issues with dairy could include

  • Lactose intolerance: Lactose is a sugar found in milk and dairy products. Many people are lactose intolerant, which means they do not have enough of the enzyme lactase to digest lactose. This can cause symptoms such as bloating, gas, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps.
  • Casein sensitivity: Casein is a protein found in milk and dairy products. Some people are sensitive to casein, which can cause symptoms such as bloating, gas, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps.
  • Cow’s milk protein allergy: Cow’s milk protein allergy (CMPA) is an allergy to the proteins in cow’s milk. Symptoms of CMPA can include hives, swelling, vomiting, diarrhea, and anaphylaxis.
  • Other dairy sensitivities: Some people may also be sensitive to other dairy components, such as lactose, casein, whey, or butterfat. This can cause various gut symptoms, such as bloating, gas, diarrhea, and constipation.

Eggs

According to the Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE) organization, about 1% of adults and 2% of children worldwide are allergic to eggs. Eggs also contain lysozyme, an enzyme found in egg whites that has been shown to increase intestinal permeability in some studies. This is also why people often become sensitive to egg whites but not the yolk. There are a few possible mechanisms by which this could occur:

  • Direct damage to the intestinal epithelium: Lysozyme is an enzyme that breaks down bacterial cell walls. Lysozyme could also damage the intestinal epithelium’s cells, increasing intestinal permeability.
  • Disruption of tight junctions: Tight junctions are proteins that seal the gaps between cells in the intestinal epithelium. Disruption of tight junctions can lead to an increase in intestinal permeability. Lysozyme has been shown to disrupt tight junctions in some studies.
  • Increased inflammation: Lysozyme can trigger an inflammatory response in the intestines. Inflammation can damage the intestinal epithelium and increase intestinal permeability.

People with pre-existing conditions that increase intestinal permeability, such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease, may be more susceptible to the effects of lysozyme on intestinal permeability. Additionally, people who consume large amounts of lysozyme, such as those who eat a lot of eggs, may also be more susceptible to the effects of lysozyme on intestinal permeability.

Gluten

A part of gluten that is known to cause issues is gliadin. Gliadin, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye, can cause intestinal permeability by several mechanisms:

  • Direct damage to the intestinal epithelium: Gliadin can directly damage the cells of the intestinal epithelium, the lining of the small intestine. This damage can disrupt the tight junctions between cells, allowing bacteria, toxins, and other harmful substances to pass through the intestinal wall and enter the bloodstream.
  • Disruption of tight junctions: Tight junctions are proteins that seal the gaps between cells in the intestinal epithelium. Gliadin can disrupt tight junctions, making it easier for harmful substances to pass through the intestinal wall.
  • Increased inflammation: Gliadin can trigger an inflammatory response in the intestines. Inflammation can damage the intestinal epithelium and increase intestinal permeability.
  • Activation of zonulin: Zonulin is a protein that plays a role in regulating intestinal permeability. Gliadin can activate zonulin, leading to an increase in intestinal permeability.
  • Altering gut microbiota: Gliadin can alter the gut microbiota, the community of bacteria that lives in the intestines. A healthy gut microbiota helps to maintain a healthy intestinal barrier. When the gut microbiota is disrupted, it can increase intestinal permeability.

Grains

Grains have been known for many issues with individuals with autoimmune diseases. To start, they contain something called lectins. Lectins are proteins found in plants that can bind to carbohydrates on the surface of cells. In the digestive tract, lectins can bind to the cells lining the intestines, causing various gut issues.

Here are some of the ways lectins can cause gut issues:

  • Damage to the intestinal lining: Lectins can damage the cells lining the intestines, causing inflammation and irritation. This can lead to diarrhea, bloating, and abdominal pain.
  • Interference with nutrient absorption: Lectins can interfere with the absorption of nutrients from food. This can lead to nutrient deficiencies, which can cause various health problems.
  • Triggering an immune response: Lectins can trigger an immune response in the intestines. This can lead to inflammation and further damage to the intestinal lining.
  • Altering gut microbiota: Lectins can alter the gut microbiota, the community of bacteria that lives in the intestines. A healthy gut microbiota is essential for maintaining a healthy intestinal barrier. When the gut microbiota is disrupted, it can increase intestinal permeability, leading to various gut issues.
  • Interference with enzyme function: Lectins can interfere with the operation of enzymes that are involved in digestion. This can lead to problems digesting food, which can cause symptoms such as gas, bloating, and diarrhea.

Grains also contain digestive enzyme inhibitors, phytates, and phytic acid, which are known to affect the gut similarly to lectins. 

Pseudo-grains and Grain-like substances

This refers to amaranth, buckwheat, chia, and quinoa. Although these are not true grains, they may contain many of the same substances as grains, such as lectins, digestive enzyme inhibitors, phytates, phytic acid, and saponins. 

Saponins are a type of phytochemical found in many plants, including beans, lentils, spinach, and quinoa. They are known for their foaming properties and are often used in soaps and detergents. However, saponins can also hurt the gut.

Here are some of the ways saponins can damage the gut:

  • Disrupting the intestinal barrier: Saponins can disrupt the tight junctions between cells in the intestinal epithelium, the small intestine’s lining. This can make it easier for harmful substances, such as bacteria, toxins, and undigested food particles, to pass through the intestinal wall and enter the bloodstream.
  • Interfering with nutrient absorption: Saponins can interfere with the absorption of nutrients from food. This can lead to nutrient deficiencies, which can cause various health problems.
  • Interfering with enzyme function: Saponins can interfere with the operation of enzymes that are involved in digestion. This can lead to problems digesting food, which can cause symptoms such as gas, bloating, and diarrhea.

The severity of gut damage caused by saponins can vary from person to person. People with pre-existing conditions that affect the gut, such as inflammatory bowel disease, may be more susceptible to the effects of saponins. Additionally, people who consume large amounts of saponins, such as those who follow a diet high in legumes or who take herbal supplements containing saponins, may also be more susceptible to the effects of saponins.

Legumes

This falls under the same reason as grains and pseudo-grains—such as lectins, digestive enzyme inhibitors, phytates, phytates phytic acid, and saponins. 

Nightshades

Nightshades contain a type of saponins called glycoalkaloids, which have been known to cause or increase intestinal permeability. Glycoalkaloids are a group of natural toxins found in plants, particularly in the nightshade family, which includes potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplants. While glycoalkaloids are not harmful in small amounts, they can cause intestinal permeability when consumed in higher quantities.

Here are some of the ways glycoalkaloids can cause intestinal permeability:

  • Disruption of tight junctions: Glycoalkaloids can disrupt the tight junctions between cells in the intestinal epithelium, the small intestine’s lining. Tight junctions are proteins that seal the gaps between cells, preventing harmful substances from passing through the intestinal wall. When tight junctions are disrupted, it can lead to an increase in intestinal permeability.
  • Damage to the intestinal epithelium: Glycoalkaloids can directly damage the cells of the intestinal epithelium. This damage can make it easier for harmful substances, such as bacteria, toxins, and undigested food particles, to pass through the intestinal wall and enter the bloodstream.
  • Increased inflammation: Glycoalkaloids can trigger an inflammatory response in the intestines. Inflammation can damage the intestinal epithelium and further increase intestinal permeability.
  • Interference with nutrient absorption: Glycoalkaloids can interfere with the absorption of nutrients from food. This can lead to nutrient deficiencies, which can cause various health problems.

Nonnutritive Sweeteners

Although much more research still needs to be done, many studies show some of the adverse long-term effects of nonnutritive sweeteners. 

Here are some of the ways that NNS have shown to be unhealthy:

  • Impact on gut microbiome: NNS can disrupt the balance of bacteria in the gut, which can lead to a variety of health problems, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and obesity.
  • Increased risk of metabolic syndrome: Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of conditions that increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. NNS has been linked to an increased risk of metabolic syndrome, even in people who do not consume large amounts of sugar.
  • Increased risk of cardiovascular disease: NNS have been linked to an increased risk of heart disease, even in people with no other risk factors. One study found that people who consumed more than two servings of diet soda per day were twice as likely to develop heart disease as people who did not drink diet soda.
  • Increased risk of cancer: Some studies have linked NNS to an increased risk of cancer, but this is a controversial area of research. More studies are needed to confirm this association.
  • Altered glucose and insulin responses: NNS can change how the body responds to glucose and insulin. This can lead to problems with blood sugar control, even in people with no history of diabetes.
  • Negative impact on cognitive function: Some studies have shown that NNS can hurt cognitive function, including memory and learning.
  • Increased cravings for sweets: NNS can increase cravings for sweets, making it harder to stick to a healthy diet.
  • Potential for addiction: Some studies have shown that NNS can be addictive, making it difficult to stop using them.

Nuts

Nuts contain digestive enzyme inhibitors and phytic acid, which was discussed earlier in the grain section. In addition, nuts have been known to be a more common food allergy. Approximately 2-3% of people worldwide are allergic to nuts. Tree nut allergies affect about 0.5-1% of the population. The prevalence of nut allergies varies depending on the region, with higher rates in Western countries. In the United States, about 1.4% of adults and 2.3% of children have tree nut allergies.

Processed Food Chemicals and Ingredients

Examples of food chemicals and ingredients include preservatives, colorings, sulfites, phosphates, and emulsifiers. Here are some examples of processed food chemicals and components and how they can impact your health:

Preservatives

  • Allergic reactions: Some people may have allergies to certain preservatives, such as sulfites, benzoates, and parabens. These allergies can cause various symptoms, including hives, itching, swelling, and difficulty breathing. In some cases, severe allergic reactions to preservatives can be life-threatening.
  • Hyperactivity: Some studies have linked certain preservatives, such as aspartame and artificial food coloring, to hyperactivity in children. 
  • Cancer: Some preservatives, such as nitrates and nitrites, can form carcinogenic compounds when cooked at high temperatures. However, the evidence on the link between preservatives and cancer is inconclusive.
  • Endocrine disruption: Some preservatives, such as parabens and phthalates, are considered endocrine disruptors. This means that they can interfere with the body’s hormone system. Endocrine disruptors have been linked to several health problems, including reproductive problems, developmental problems, and cancer.
  • Respiratory problems: Some preservatives, such as sulfites, can trigger asthma attacks in people with asthma.
  • Digestive problems: Some preservatives, such as benzoates, can cause digestive issues, such as gas, bloating, and diarrhea.

Food Coloring

  • Hyperactivity in Children;: Some studies have linked certain artificial food colorings, such as Red 40, Yellow 5, and Yellow 6, to hyperactivity and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. However, more research is needed to confirm this link.
  • Allergic Reactions: Some people may have allergies to certain food colorings, such as tartrazine (yellow dye) and carmine (red dye). These allergies can cause various symptoms, including hives, itching, swelling, and difficulty breathing. In severe cases, allergic reactions to food colorings can be life-threatening.
  • Cancer: Some studies have raised concerns about the potential link between certain food colorings, such as Red 40 and Yellow 5, and increased cancer risk. However, the evidence is inconclusive, and more research is needed to confirm this link.
  • Endocrine Disruption: Some food colorings, such as parabens and phthalates, are considered endocrine disruptors. These chemicals can interfere with the body’s hormone system, potentially leading to reproductive problems, developmental issues, and cancer.
  • Digestive Issues: Some food colorings, such as sulfites, may cause digestive problems, such as gas, bloating, and diarrhea.
  • Behavioral Changes: Some studies suggest that certain food colorings may influence behavior and mood, particularly in children. However, more research is needed to confirm these findings.

Sulfites

  • Allergic Reactions: Sulfite allergies are rare but can cause severe reactions in sensitive individuals. Symptoms of sulfite allergies can include hives, itching, swelling, difficulty breathing, and, in extreme cases, anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction.
  • Asthma Exacerbations: Sulfites can trigger asthma attacks in individuals with pre-existing asthma. The severity of the reaction can vary depending on the individual’s sensitivity to sulfites and the amount of sulfite consumed.
  • Digestive Issues: Sulfites may cause digestive problems, such as gas, bloating, and diarrhea, in some individuals, particularly those with sensitive digestive systems.
  • Headaches and Migraines: Sulfites have been linked to headaches and migraines in some individuals. The exact mechanism by which sulfites trigger headaches is not fully understood, but it may be related to their effects on blood vessels and inflammation.
  • Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) Deficiency: Sulfites can interfere with the absorption of vitamin B1 (thiamin), an essential nutrient in energy production and nerve function. Prolonged exposure to high levels of sulfites may lead to thiamin deficiency, which can cause symptoms such as fatigue, weakness, and numbness or tingling in the hands and feet.
  • Skin Reactions: Sulfites may cause skin reactions, such as redness, itching, and dermatitis, in some individuals. These reactions are more likely to occur in people with sensitive skin or sulfite allergies.
  • Possible Endocrine Disruption: Some studies suggest that sulfites may act as endocrine disruptors, interfering with the body’s hormone system. However, more research is needed to confirm this link and fully understand the potential effects of sulfites on endocrine function.

Phosphates

  • Impaired iron absorption: Excessive phosphate intake can interfere with iron absorption from food. This can lead to iron deficiency, which can cause anemia, fatigue, weakness, and other health problems.
  • Impaired zinc absorption: Excessive phosphate intake can also interfere with zinc absorption from food. Zinc is essential for immune function, wound healing, and other bodily processes. Zinc deficiency can weaken immune systems, wound healing, and other health problems.
  • Impaired magnesium absorption: Excessive phosphate intake can also interfere with magnesium absorption from food. Magnesium is an essential nutrient important for muscle and nerve function, blood sugar control, and other bodily processes. Magnesium deficiency can lead to muscle cramps, fatigue, irregular heartbeat, and other health problems.

Emulsifiers 

  • Increased intestinal permeability: Emulsifiers can disrupt the tight junctions between cells in the intestinal epithelium, the small intestine’s lining. Tight junctions are proteins that seal the gaps between cells, preventing harmful substances, such as bacteria, toxins, and undigested food particles, from passing through the intestinal wall and entering the bloodstream. When tight junctions are disrupted, it can increase intestinal permeability, also known as leaky gut. A leaky gut can contribute to various health problems, including food sensitivities, autoimmune diseases, and chronic inflammation.
  • Altered gut microbiota: Emulsifiers can alter the gut microbiota, the community of bacteria that lives in the intestines. A healthy gut microbiota is essential for maintaining a healthy intestinal barrier, supporting digestion and nutrient absorption, and regulating the immune system. When the gut microbiota is disrupted, it can increase intestinal permeability, contribute to inflammation, and reduce the body’s ability to fight off infections.
  • Increased inflammation: Emulsifiers can trigger an inflammatory response in the intestines. Inflammation can damage the intestinal epithelium, further increase intestinal permeability, and contribute to various health problems, including food sensitivities, autoimmune diseases, and chronic inflammation.
  • Interference with nutrient absorption: Emulsifiers can interfere with the absorption of nutrients from food. This can lead to nutrient deficiencies, which can cause various health problems, including fatigue, weakness, and impaired immune function.
  • Cardiovascular risks: Some studies suggest that excessive intake of certain emulsifiers, such as carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and polysorbate 80 (P80), may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular problems, including heart disease and stroke. However, more research is needed to confirm this link.

Processed Vegetable Oils

There can be many issues with processed vegetable oil, mainly the Omega-6 fatty acids we consume in excess compared to Omega-3 fatty acids. 

  • Heart disease: Processed vegetable oils, particularly those high in omega-6 fatty acids, have been associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Omega-6 fatty acids can promote inflammation and reduce HDL (good) cholesterol levels.
  • Type 2 diabetes: Processed vegetable oils may also increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. This is because they can contribute to insulin resistance, a condition in which the body’s cells become less responsive to insulin, the hormone that regulates blood sugar levels.
  • Obesity: Processed vegetable oils are high in calories, which can contribute to weight gain and obesity. They are also often found in processed foods that are high in sugar and unhealthy fats, which can further increase the risk of obesity.
  • Inflammation: Processed vegetable oils can promote inflammation throughout the body. Chronic inflammation is linked to several health problems, including heart disease, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.
  • Digestive problems: Processed vegetable oils may also be linked to digestive problems, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This is because they can disrupt the balance of gut bacteria and cause inflammation in the digestive tract.
  • Nutrient deficiencies: Processed vegetable oils can interfere with absorbing certain nutrients, such as vitamin E and carotenoids. These nutrients are essential for immune function, vision, and other bodily processes.
  • Oxidative stress: Processed vegetable oils can become oxidized when exposed to heat or light. Oxidized fats can produce harmful compounds called free radicals, damaging cells and contributing to aging and disease.
  • Immune dysfunction: Some studies suggest processed vegetable oils may impair immune function. This is because they may interfere with the production of white blood cells, essential for fighting off infections.

Seeds

Seeds contain phytic acid and digestive enzyme inhibitors, which were discussed in the grains section. In addition, it is one of the more common foods people tend to be allergic to. Allergies to seeds are relatively common, affecting an estimated 1-2% of the world’s population. The prevalence of seed allergies varies depending on the region and the type of seed. For example, tree nut allergies are more common in Western countries, while sesame allergies are more common in Asia.

Sugar (Added)

Added sugar is not naturally occurring in a food such as a fruit. It is a sugar that is added to a product. Known issues with sugar include diabetes, insulin resistance,and hypoglycemia, to name a few. 

Excessive sugar consumption has been linked to several health problems, including:

  • Weight gain and obesity: Sugar is a high-calorie nutrient, and consuming too much can lead to weight gain and obesity. Obesity is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, including heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer.
  • Type 2 diabetes: Sugar consumption can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes by increasing insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate blood sugar levels. When the body becomes resistant to insulin, it has to produce more insulin to keep blood sugar levels in check. Over time, the pancreas can become overworked and may not be able to produce enough insulin, leading to type 2 diabetes.
  • Heart disease: Sugar consumption can increase the risk of heart disease by raising triglyceride levels and lowering HDL (good) cholesterol levels. Triglycerides are a type of fat found in the blood. High triglyceride levels are a risk factor for heart disease. HDL (good) cholesterol helps remove LDL (bad) cholesterol from the blood. LDL (bad) cholesterol can build up in the arteries and form plaques, which can lead to heart attack and stroke.
  • Dental caries (tooth decay): Sugar is a major contributor to tooth decay. When sugar comes into contact with bacteria in the mouth, it produces acids that can erode tooth enamel and lead to cavities.
  • Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD): Sugar consumption can contribute to the development of NAFLD by increasing the amount of fat stored in the liver. NAFLD can lead to liver inflammation and scarring and in severe cases, liver failure.
  • Increased risk of certain cancers: Some studies suggest that a high-sugar diet may increase the risk of certain types of cancer, such as colon cancer, breast cancer, and endometrial cancer.
  • Altered gut microbiome: Sugar consumption can disrupt the balance of bacteria in the gut, which can lead to several health problems, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and obesity.
  • Nutritional deficiencies: Sugar-filled foods are often low in essential nutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Consuming too many sugar-filled foods can lead to dietary deficiencies.
  • Increased energy intake and decreased nutrient density: Sugary drinks and foods provide a quick burst of energy but are low in nutrients. This can lead to a cycle of overeating and nutrient deficiency.
  • Increased cravings for sweets: Consuming sugar can increase cravings for more sweets, making it harder to stick to a healthy diet.

Sugar Alcohols 

Sugar alcohols, also known as polyols, are a group of carbohydrates that are found naturally in some fruits and vegetables. They are also produced industrially and used as food additives to sweeten foods without adding calories or raising blood sugar levels. There are some potential health issues associated with excessive intake.

Here are some of the potential health issues associated with sugar alcohols:

  • Digestive issues: Sugar alcohols are not fully absorbed by the small intestine, so they travel to the large intestine, fermented by gut bacteria. This fermentation can produce gas, bloating, and diarrhea, especially in people with sensitive digestive systems or those who consume large amounts of sugar alcohol.
  • Potential role in weight gain: While sugar alcohols are non-caloric, they can still contribute to weight gain if they are consumed in excess. This is because sugar alcohols stimulate insulin release, increasing appetite and fat storage.
  • Potential role in blood sugar control: Some sugar alcohols, such as sorbitol and mannitol, can cause a slight rise in blood sugar levels. This may be a concern for people with diabetes or prediabetes.
  • Potential role in cardiovascular health: Some studies suggest that excessive consumption of certain sugar alcohols, such as erythritol, may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events, including heart attack and stroke. However, more research is needed to confirm this link.
  • Intestinal Permeability: There is some evidence that sugar alcohols, also known as polyols, can increase intestinal permeability in specific individuals. Intestinal permeability is when the tight junctions between the cells in the intestinal lining become loose, allowing harmful substances to pass through the intestinal wall and into the bloodstream. Studies have shown that sugar alcohols can disrupt the tight junctions between intestinal cells, increasing intestinal permeability. This effect is thought to be due to the fermentation of sugar alcohols by gut bacteria, which produces short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). SCFAs can increase the permeability of the intestinal lining by reducing the expression of tight junction proteins. However, it is essential to note that not all sugar alcohols have the same effect on intestinal permeability. 

When reviewing the possible effects of the food listed above, it is easy to assume we should never have these foods in our diets. However, this is different. One of the main reasons the AIP elimination diet works so well is that it eliminates many possible contributors to poor health and allows the gut to heal. During the reintroduction period, it will enable you to pinpoint which items are affecting your health and remove them from your diet. The reintroduction is just as if not more important, to help you heal and live your life to the fullest!

One-on-one nutrition counseling session focusing on autoimmune dietary strategies.

About Stephanie

Stephanie has earned the AIP Certified Coach Practitioner certificate, completed her internship at Elevate Health, clinical rotation at NUNM, then went onto open her own practice, Nutrition for Autoimmunity. She graduated from Portland State University and earned a master’s degree in Nutrition from National University of Natural Medicine.

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